International Drive supports sister school in Kenya

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International Drive supports sister school in Kenya

Leo Magnaye ’05 holds a poster displaying the progress of the International Drive.

Leo Magnaye ’05 holds a poster displaying the progress of the International Drive.

Jordan Noeuku ’21

Leo Magnaye ’05 holds a poster displaying the progress of the International Drive.

Jordan Noeuku ’21

Jordan Noeuku ’21

Leo Magnaye ’05 holds a poster displaying the progress of the International Drive.

Jordan Noeuku ’21, Staff Writer

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The collection of money to help Riordan’s sister school in Kenya was done in a peaceful atmosphere as the Crusader brothers expressed their generosity by donating a generous sum of money during the International Drive, which ran from March 19 to 29.

“As a rough estimate, $1,200 was collected. Students overwhelmingly showed their generosity by donating whatever amount of money they have,” said Joshua Keeney, the co- moderator of CORE service team. “Those who benefitted from this donation in Nairobi will be able to provide furniture for kids’ education for the year, and also provide food.”

He continued, saying, “A few years ago, Chang Liu ’18 went to Kenya and actually visited the school, but we had difficulties getting people motivated to give, and how to advertise for it and the blood drive.”

“As an educator, I am extremely passionate about students having the means and being able to attend school and receive a quality education,” said Julia Balisteri, the moderator for the drive.

“The great disparity in cost between schools in the states and Kenya is outrageous to me, but also allows me the chance to help contribute to the education of students.”

Furthermore, she said, “Sometimes as students, and I remember doing this as well, it is easy to get stuck in thinking, ‘Oh, I’m forced to be here’ or ‘I hate doing so much work, this is awful.’ We can forget how much this quality education bene ts us in our futures when we want to go into college or a trade school or even the workforce. To be able to even help out one student receive the education they need to succeed is incredibly important to me.” She concluded, saying, “We send the money and a letter to our sister school in Nairobi, Kenya after the drive. Throughout the year the students send back notes of thanks with information of how the money has speci cally helped them. Hearing from the students themselves helps us see how much of an impact donating the cost of a fancy coffee drink can achieve. All communication, at least for last year and this year, occurs through letters!”

“The international drive means the chance of helping students that are less fortunate than I am, who don’t have the supplies that they need for their education,” said Jonathan Torrea ’21. “Luckily, I haven’t been in a situation where I was less fortune because my parent always make sure they prioritize my educational needs.”

He added, “Also, the aspect I would emphasize about the international drive is that of charity, because it goes toward a good cause.”